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The D'Alembert System put to the test

  • The D’Alembert system is well-known for being the simplest and lowest risk progressive roulette strategy in existence, but what’s it actually like to play it? 
  • We decided to give it a try at Intercasino, using an established testing format and live games
D'Alembert: No fool...

The D’Alembert system is well-known for being the simplest and lowest risk progressive roulette strategy in existence, but what’s it actually like to play it? We decided to give it a try at Intercasino, using an established testing format and live games – but first a recap on how it works:

D’Alembert’s system requires you to increase your bet by £1 when you lose, and decrease it by £1 when you win. It’s that simple, so what happened when we tried it out with a £100 bankroll and starting bet of £10?

We bet on evens, and our first of three simulations kicked off with a 33, taking us down to £90
Our bet was therefore raised to 11 and a 9 came up, leaving our bankroll at £79
We therefore bet 12, and a 2 came up – taking us back up to £91, lowering our bet to £11
A 5 was spun, leaving us with £80
A £12 bet wasted on number 11 left us with just £68
We now bet £13, and things looked up with a 12, taking us to £81
A £12 bet and the appearance of 36 raised our bankroll further, up to £93
A zero then left us with £82
Another £12 bet left us with £94
Finally a 4 was spun, taking us to £105

Not a bad result, but more was to follow in the 2nd simulation:

A 6 took us to £110
£9 bet on a 3 left us with £101
Back up to £10, our stake brought in another tenner with a 12 on the wheel
A £9 bet led to a loss of £9 when an 11 came up, taking us down to £102
A further £10 was lost when the number 1 appeared
Then a 4 came in, taking us to £103
A £10 bet yielded a £10 win when 28 came up, leaving us with £113
Then a 30 was spun leaving us with £122
£8 bet on number 3 left us with £114
Lastly, a £9 bet on the number 2 left us with £123

With 2 out of 3 simulations yielding us a decent overall result we were delighted, but the law of averages says you can’t win all of the time, so what of our final test?

We started badly with a 27 taking our bankroll to £90. 
An increased bet of £11 and the appearance of the number 12 changed all that, getting us up to £101.
An 8 took us to £111
A 14 left us at £120
We now bet £8 and spun a 9, leaving us with £112
A 6 got us up to £121
A 15 took us to £113
The zero was then spun – no good for us as this was a European game so we lost the whole £9 stake, taking our bankroll to £104
A loss of £10 when the 1 came up left us with £94
Another loss of £11 on the number 11 finally left us with just £83.

The total outcome was £302 for £200 wagered, and this is a classic D’Alembert outcome: A small increase for a small amount of risk. The great thing about this strategy is that two subsequent spins will always produce a positive result 75% of the time: 

In the above example, a win and a loss will leave you with £101; a loss and a win will also leave you with £101, and two wins will leave you with £119 – so the advantages are clear. 

You’ll find that your overall result tends to cluster around the £100 mark, so the amounts you win won’t be huge – but any savvy roulette player will tell you that you should be looking for small consistent long-term net wins which ultimately consolidate into solid long-term gains, and this system is a great way to do that. 


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The D'Alembert System put to the test

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